EA Series – Episode 22: How to make it right…

“There are times when your gut instinct tells you that a solution is wrong.  The architecture or design is not clean, functionality seems to be in the wrong place, interfaces feel like they should be different, data is duplicated or tramped all over the landscape, the solution seems too complex, it appears inflexible, it seems to be storing up problems for the future. 

However, convincing people that there is a problem and that an alternative approach is better can be difficult.    The project or program has a momentum that is carrying it towards the creation of an expensive and avoidable legacy.”

Sounds familiar? Well, this is a situation in which most of us find ourselves in. The author in his ‘Chief Architect’ blog gives an excellent set of Do’s and Don’ts in such a situation. Keeping the Don’ts for you to read in the original article, let me summarize a list of carefully explained steps to put forward your argument and convince the different stakeholders. Again for the implementation steps refer the original article:

Step 1: Determine your goal
Step 2: Understand the business drivers
Step 3: Understand which business drivers are threatened

At this stage, the author shares a small thought on architecture principle…

“Each architecture principle should have a rationale that is clearly based on business needs.  If a solution violates a principle then look to the rationale to identify the business imperative that the principle is designed to support.  While the principle may not interest many stakeholders, the underlying rationale should do.”

Step 4: Understand the stakeholders
Step 5: Address objections
Step 6: Drill down on the business impacts
Step 7: Frame your initial solution options
Step 8: Carry out a feasibility study

The author finally concludes by advising to always expect the unexpected. Link to the original article: http://chiefarchitect.squarespace.com/ea/2009/6/9/how-to-make-it-right.html

In your role, have you ever been in such a situation? 

“There are times when your gut instinct tells you that a solution is wrong.  The architecture or design is not clean, functionality seems to be in the wrong place, interfaces feel like they should be different, data is duplicated or tramped all over the landscape, the solution seems too complex, it appears inflexible, it seems to be storing up problems for the future. 

However, convincing people that there is a problem and that an alternative approach is better can be difficult.    The project or program has a momentum that is carrying it towards the creation of an expensive and avoidable legacy.”

Sounds familiar? Well, this is a situation in which most of us find ourselves in. The author in his ‘Chief Architect’ blog gives an excellent set of Do’s and Don’ts in such a situation.

Keeping the Don’ts for you to read in the original article, let me summarize a list of carefully explained steps to put forward your argument and convince the different stakeholders. Again for the implementation steps refer the original article:

Step 1: Determine your goal
Step 2: Understand the business drivers
Step 3: Understand which business drivers are threatened

At this stage, the author shares a small thought on architecture principle…

“Each architecture principle should have a rationale that is clearly based on business needs.  If a solution violates a principle then look to the rationale to identify the business imperative that the principle is designed to support.  While the principle may not interest many stakeholders, the underlying rationale should do.”

Step 4: Understand the stakeholders
Step 5: Address objections
Step 6: Drill down on the business impacts
Step 7: Frame your initial solution options
Step 8: Carry out a feasibility study

The author finally concludes by advising to always expect the unexpected.

Link to the original article:
http://chiefarchitect.squarespace.com/ea/2009/6/9/how-to-make-it-right.html

In your role, have you ever been in such a situation?

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